Anne Lamott Quote

The garden is one of the two great metaphors for humanity.The garden is about life and beauty and the impermanence of all living things.The garden is about feeding your children, providing food for the tribe.It’s part of an urgent territorial drive that we can probably trace back to animals storing food.It’s a competitive display mechanism, like having a prize bull, this greed for the best tomatoes and English tea roses.It’s about winning; about providing society with superior things; and about proving that you have taste, and good values, and you work hard.And what a wonderful relief, every so often, to know who the enemy is.Because in the garden, the enemy is everything: the aphids, the weather, time.And so you pour yourself into it, care so much, and see up close so much birth, and growth, and beauty, and danger, and triumph.And then everything dies anyway, right?But you just keep doing it.

Anne Lamott

The garden is one of the two great metaphors for humanity.The garden is about life and beauty and the impermanence of all living things.The garden is about feeding your children, providing food for the tribe.It’s part of an urgent territorial drive that we can probably trace back to animals storing food.It’s a competitive display mechanism, like having a prize bull, this greed for the best tomatoes and English tea roses.It’s about winning; about providing society with superior things; and about proving that you have taste, and good values, and you work hard.And what a wonderful relief, every so often, to know who the enemy is.Because in the garden, the enemy is everything: the aphids, the weather, time.And so you pour yourself into it, care so much, and see up close so much birth, and growth, and beauty, and danger, and triumph.And then everything dies anyway, right?But you just keep doing it.

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About Anne Lamott

Anne Lamott (born April 10, 1954) is an American novelist and non-fiction writer.
She is also a progressive political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher. Lamott is based in Marin County, California. Her nonfiction works are largely autobiographical. Lamott's writings, marked by their self-deprecating humor and openness, cover such subjects as alcoholism, single-motherhood, depression, and Christianity.