Neil Gaiman Quote

Each of the dancers took a partner, the living with the dead, each to each. Bod reached out his hand and found himself touching fingers with, and gazing into the grey eyes of, the lady in the cobweb dress. She smiled at him.Hello, Bod, she said.Hello, he said, as he danced with her. I don’t know your name.Names aren’t really important, she said.I love your horse. He’s so big! I never knew horses could be that big.He is gentle enough to bear the mightiest of you away on his broad back, and strong enough for the smallest of you as well.Can I ride him? asked Bod.One day, she told him, and her cobweb skirts shimmered. One day. Everybody does.Promise?I promise.

Neil Gaiman

Each of the dancers took a partner, the living with the dead, each to each. Bod reached out his hand and found himself touching fingers with, and gazing into the grey eyes of, the lady in the cobweb dress. She smiled at him.Hello, Bod, she said.Hello, he said, as he danced with her. I don’t know your name.Names aren’t really important, she said.I love your horse. He’s so big! I never knew horses could be that big.He is gentle enough to bear the mightiest of you away on his broad back, and strong enough for the smallest of you as well.Can I ride him? asked Bod.One day, she told him, and her cobweb skirts shimmered. One day. Everybody does.Promise?I promise.

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About Neil Gaiman

Neil Richard MacKinnon Gaiman (born Neil Richard Gaiman; born 10 November 1960) is an English author of short fiction, novels, comic books, graphic novels, nonfiction, audio theatre, and films. His works include the comic book series The Sandman and novels Stardust, Anasi Boys, American Gods, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. He has won numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards, as well as the Newbery and Carnegie medals. He is the first author to win both the Newbery and the Carnegie medals for the same work, The Graveyard Book (2008). In 2013, The Ocean at the End of the Lane was voted Book of the Year in the British National Book Awards. It was later adapted into a critically acclaimed stage play at the Royal National Theatre in London, England that The Independent called "...theatre at its best".