Patrick Lencioni Quote

Ricky asks her, You lost your earrings in the living room? She shakes her head. No, I lost them in the bedroom. But the light out here is much better. And there it is. Most leaders prefer to look for answers where the light is better, where they are more comfortable. And the light is certainly better in the measurable, objective, and data-driven world of organizational intelligence (the smart side of the equation) than it is in the messier, more unpredictable world of organizational health. Studying spreadsheets and Gantt charts and financial statements is relatively safe and predictable, which most executives prefer. That’s how they’ve been trained, and that’s where they’re comfortable. What they usually want to avoid at all costs are subjective conversations that can easily become emotional and awkward. And organizational health is certainly fraught with the potential for subjective and awkward conversations.

Patrick Lencioni

Ricky asks her, You lost your earrings in the living room? She shakes her head. No, I lost them in the bedroom. But the light out here is much better. And there it is. Most leaders prefer to look for answers where the light is better, where they are more comfortable. And the light is certainly better in the measurable, objective, and data-driven world of organizational intelligence (the smart side of the equation) than it is in the messier, more unpredictable world of organizational health. Studying spreadsheets and Gantt charts and financial statements is relatively safe and predictable, which most executives prefer. That’s how they’ve been trained, and that’s where they’re comfortable. What they usually want to avoid at all costs are subjective conversations that can easily become emotional and awkward. And organizational health is certainly fraught with the potential for subjective and awkward conversations.

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About Patrick Lencioni

Patrick Lencioni (born c. 1965) is an American author of books on business management, particularly in relation to team management. He is best known as the author of The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, a popular business fable that explores work team dynamics and offers solutions to help teams perform better.In addition to Five Dysfunctions of a Team, he has written ten other business books: The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business; Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Death by Meeting, Silos, Politics and Turf Wars, The Five Temptations of a CEO, The Motive, The Four Obsessions of an Extraordinary Executive, The Three Signs of a Miserable Job, Getting Naked, and The Ideal Team Player. He has also applied his management techniques to families in The Three Big Questions for a Frantic Family.