Kevin Rudd Quote

By 2050, the Australian population is expected to grow from 22 million to 36 million. That increase alone will put huge pressure on our towns and our cities. We will need more homes, more roads, more rail lines, more hospitals, more schools, just to accommodate so many Australians.

Kevin Rudd

By 2050, the Australian population is expected to grow from 22 million to 36 million. That increase alone will put huge pressure on our towns and our cities. We will need more homes, more roads, more rail lines, more hospitals, more schools, just to accommodate so many Australians.

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About Kevin Rudd

Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957) is an Australian diplomat and former politician who served as the 26th prime minister of Australia from 2007 to 2010 and June to September 2013. He held office as the leader of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). Rudd has been serving as the 23rd and current ambassador of Australia to the United States since 2023.
Born in Nambour, Queensland, Rudd graduated from the Australian National University with honours in Chinese studies, and is fluent in Mandarin. Before politics, he worked as a diplomat and public servant for the Queensland state government of Wayne Goss. Rudd was elected to the Australian House of Representatives at the 1998 federal election, as a member of parliament (MP) for Griffith. Promoted to the shadow cabinet in 2001 as Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs, and assumed leadership of the Labor Party in December 2006 by defeating Kim Beazley in a leadership spill, becoming leader of the opposition. Rudd led Labor to a landslide victory at the 2007 election; his government's earliest acts included ratifying the Kyoto Protocol on climate change and delivering the first national apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples for the Stolen Generations. His government responded to the financial crisis of 2007–2008, implementing economic stimulus packages that resulted in Australia becoming one of the only developed countries to avoid the Great Recession. Rudd's government also oversaw the establishment of the National Broadband Network (NBN), the launch of the Digital Education Revolution and the Building the Education Revolution, dismantled WorkChoices, and withdrew Australian troops from the Iraq War.
By 2010, Rudd's leadership faltered due to a loss of support among the Labor caucus and failure to pass key legislation like Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. In June 2010, Rudd resigned as prime minister after his deputy Julia Gilard challenged him in a leadership spill. He was replaced by Gillard as prime minister, who later appointed him as the Minister for Foreign Affairs in her government. Leadership tensions between Rudd and Gillard would continue, leading to Rudd resigning as Foreign Minister in February 2012 to unsuccessfully challenge her for the leadership of the party. After a lengthy political rivalry between the two, Rudd defeated Gillard in a final leadership ballot in June 2013, becoming prime minister for the second time. However, Labor were defeated in the 2013 election, ending his second term after only two months.
Rudd retired from parliament following the election, but has stayed active in political discourse and academia. He has been involved in a number of international organizations, advocating for issues such as China-United States relations and Australian media diversity, and was appointed as Australia's Ambassador to the U.S. by the Albanese government in March 2023.
Rudd maintained long periods of popularity in opinion polls during his initial tenure as prime minister for his management of the global financial crisis and his well renowned apology to the Indigenous community, acheiving some of the highest approval ratings for an Australian prime minister on record during the height of the financial crisis. However, he would see a rapid decrease in popularity after his failed handling of legislative negotiations, ultimately leading to the demise of his premiership. The circumstances of his removal from office have remained controversial; his supporters have decried the undemocratic nature of his ousting, while critics have accused him of an autocratic and flawed leadership style. He is often ranked in the middle-to-lower tier of Australian prime ministers.