Jonah Goldberg Quote

No nation influenced American thinking more profoundly than Germany, W.E.B. DuBois, Charles Beard, Walter Weyl, Richard Ely, Richard Ely, Nicholas Murray Butler, and countless other founders of modern American liberalism were among the nine thousand Americans who studied in German universities during the nineteenth century. When the American Economic Association was formed, five of the six first officers had studied in Germany. At least twenty of its first twenty-six presidents had as well. In 1906 a professor at Yale polled the top 116 economists and social scientists in America; more than half had studied in Germany for at least a year. By their own testimony, these intellectuals felt liberated by the experience of studying in an intellectual environment predicated on the assumption that experts could mold society like clay.No European statesman loomed larger in the minds and hearts of American progressives than Otto von Bismarck. As inconvenient as it may be for those who have been taught the continuity between Bismarck and Hitler, writes Eric Goldman, Bismarck's Germany was a catalytic of American progressive thought. Bismarck's top-down socialism, which delivered the eight-hour workday, healthcare, social insurance, and the like, was the gold standard for enlightened social policy. Give the working-man the right to work as long as he is healthy; assure him care when he is sick; assure him maintenance when he is old, he famously told the Reichstag in 1862. Bismarck was the original Third Way figure who triangulated between both ends of the ideological spectrum. A government must not waver once it has chosen its course. It must not look to the left or right but go forward, he proclaimed. Teddy Roosevelt's 1912 national Progressive Party platform conspicuously borrowed from the Prussian model. Twenty-five years earlier, the political scientist Woodrow Wilson wrote that Bismarck's welfare state was an admirable system . . . the most studied and most nearly perfected in the world.

Jonah Goldberg

No nation influenced American thinking more profoundly than Germany, W.E.B. DuBois, Charles Beard, Walter Weyl, Richard Ely, Richard Ely, Nicholas Murray Butler, and countless other founders of modern American liberalism were among the nine thousand Americans who studied in German universities during the nineteenth century. When the American Economic Association was formed, five of the six first officers had studied in Germany. At least twenty of its first twenty-six presidents had as well. In 1906 a professor at Yale polled the top 116 economists and social scientists in America; more than half had studied in Germany for at least a year. By their own testimony, these intellectuals felt liberated by the experience of studying in an intellectual environment predicated on the assumption that experts could mold society like clay.No European statesman loomed larger in the minds and hearts of American progressives than Otto von Bismarck. As inconvenient as it may be for those who have been taught the continuity between Bismarck and Hitler, writes Eric Goldman, Bismarck's Germany was a catalytic of American progressive thought. Bismarck's top-down socialism, which delivered the eight-hour workday, healthcare, social insurance, and the like, was the gold standard for enlightened social policy. Give the working-man the right to work as long as he is healthy; assure him care when he is sick; assure him maintenance when he is old, he famously told the Reichstag in 1862. Bismarck was the original Third Way figure who triangulated between both ends of the ideological spectrum. A government must not waver once it has chosen its course. It must not look to the left or right but go forward, he proclaimed. Teddy Roosevelt's 1912 national Progressive Party platform conspicuously borrowed from the Prussian model. Twenty-five years earlier, the political scientist Woodrow Wilson wrote that Bismarck's welfare state was an admirable system . . . the most studied and most nearly perfected in the world.

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About Jonah Goldberg

Jonah Jacob Goldberg (born March 21, 1969) is an American conservative syndicated columnist, author, political analyst, and commentator. The founding editor of National Review Online, from 1998 until 2019 he was an editor at National Review. Goldberg writes a weekly column about politics and culture for the Los Angeles Times. In October 2019, Goldberg became founding editor of the online opinion and news publication The Dispatch. Goldberg has authored the No. 1 New York Times bestseller Liberal Fascism, released in January 2008; The Tyranny of Cliches: How Liberals Cheat in the War of Ideas, released in 2012; and Suicide of the West, which was published in April 2018 and also became a New York Times bestseller, reaching No. 5 on the list the following month.Goldberg is also a regular contributor on news networks such as CNN and MSNBC, appearing on various television programs including Good Morning America, Nightline, Hardball with Chris Matthews, Real Time with Bill Maher, Larry King Live, Your World with Neil Cavuto, the Glenn Beck Program, and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. Goldberg was an occasional guest on a number of Fox News shows such as The Five, The Greg Gutfeld Show, and Outnumbered. He was also a frequent panelist on Special Report with Bret Baier. From 2006 to 2010, Goldberg was a frequent participant on bloggingheads.tv. Goldberg has been a noted critic of President Donald Trump, fellow Republicans, and the conservative media complex during and after the Trump presidency. In November 2021 Goldberg and his colleague Steve Hayes resigned from Fox News in protest over Tucker Carlson's documentary Patriot Purge. Goldberg described the documentary as "a collection of incoherent conspiracy-mongering, riddled with factual inaccuracies, half-truths, deceptive imagery, and damning omissions."