Tracy Kidder Quote

It was an IBM machine, archaic now but gaudy then. The university owned it, in effect, and it lay inside a room that none but the machine’s professional caretakers could enter during the day. But Alsing found out that a student could just walk into that room at night and play with the computer. Alsing didn’t drink much and he never took any other drugs. I was a midnight programmer, he confessed.

Tracy Kidder

It was an IBM machine, archaic now but gaudy then. The university owned it, in effect, and it lay inside a room that none but the machine’s professional caretakers could enter during the day. But Alsing found out that a student could just walk into that room at night and play with the computer. Alsing didn’t drink much and he never took any other drugs. I was a midnight programmer, he confessed.

Related Quotes

About Tracy Kidder

John Tracy Kidder (born November 12, 1945) is an American writer of nonfiction books. He received the Pulitzer Prize for his The Soul of a New Machine (1981), about the creation of a new computer at Data General Corporation. He has received praise and awards for other works, including his biography of Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist, titled Mountains Beyond Mountains (2003).
Kidder is considered a literary journalist because of the strong story line and personal voice in his writing.: 5  He has cited as his writing influences John McPhee, A. J. Liebling, and George Orwell.: 127–128  In a 1984 interview he said, "McPhee has been my model. He's the most elegant of all the journalists writing today, I think.": 7 Kidder wrote in a 1994 essay, "In fiction, believability may have nothing to do with reality or even plausibility. It has everything to do with those things in nonfiction. I think that the nonfiction writer's fundamental job is to make what is true believable."